DeKalb Schools 2018 CCRPI Scores

GaDOE

The DeKalb County School District (DCSD) earned a score of 70 in the Georgia’s 2018 College and Career Ready Performance Index (CCRPI).

The Governor’s Office of Student Achievement (GOSA) assigns grades of A–F to schools based on the CCRPI score. GOSA terms schools “failing” if the CCRPI score is less than 60.

What is CCRPI?
The College and Career Ready Performance Index (CCRPI) is Georgia’s statewide accountability system, implemented in 2012 to replace the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) measurement, after the U.S. Department of Education granted Georgia’s waiver from NCLB.

CCRPI CALCULATION

State education authorities revamped the 2018 CCRPI to reflect school performance as outlined in the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) federal law. As a result, the indicators, weights, and calculations have been revised. Georgia DOE says “The methods used to calculate SY 17/18 CCRPI Scores changed so much from SY 16/17 to SY 17/18 that simple comparisons between the two years should not be made.”

Furthermore, according to the GADOE, “Incidentally, CCRPI scores were up in SY 16/17 because of the removal of Milestones in science and social studies in certain grades. Last year, removing science and social studies preferentially improved the scores of our elementary schools.”

So … thanks GADOE for making this somewhat useless.

Major difference in the methods used to calculate CCRPI are:
• Indicators and components are capped at 100. In the past schools could earn more than 100 points for some indicators.
• Progress indicators are now weighted.
• Closing the gaps indicator is new and the scores on this indicator vary widely. This indicator is calculated based on the Milestones proficiency of the student subgroups in a school.
• Weights for various components changed.
• Exceeding the bar and other bonus-point indicators have been removed.

CCRPI SCORE BY SCHOOL

DeKalb Schools 2018 CCRPI Score Trend CCRPI SCORE
Reg School 2016 2017 2018
0 Dekalb County School District 66.6 69.9 70
0 State of Georgia 73.6 75 TBD
4 ALLGOOD ES 61.2 64.7 77.4
1 ASHFORD PARK ES 87.5 97.5 91.6
3 ARABIA MOUNTAIN HS 93.2 92.3 84.8
1 AUSTIN ES 97.1 94.4 92.7
2 AVONDALE ES 56.1 59.2 67
7 BARACK H OBAMA ELEMENTARY MAGNET SCHOOL NA 59.2 70.4
5 BOB MATHIS ES 60.5 63.9 72.6
2 BRIAR VISTA ES 74.8 69.8 76
2 BRIARLAKE ES 78.5 81.6 83.4
2 BROCKETT ES 80.2 82.7 75.9
5 BROWNS MILL ES 51.8 51.2 67.9
6 CANBY LANE ES 57.1 62.1 61.4
1 CARY REYNOLDS ES 66.5 59.2 66.4
7 CEDAR GROVE ES 60.5 62.8 66.7
7 CEDAR GROVE HS 78.4 79.5 67
7 CEDAR GROVE MS 51.7 60.5 68.3
1 CHAMBLEE HS 87.5 83.3 79.4
1 CHAMBLEE MS 85.1 82.6 77.4
5 CHAPEL HILL ES 50 63.4 56.1
5 CHAPEL HILL MS 65.2 66.9 53.1
1 CHESNUT ES 61 79.7 90.4
4 CLARKSTON HS 70.9 75.4 67.4
6 COLUMBIA ES 53 60 56.6
6 COLUMBIA HS 64.7 68 63.3
6 COLUMBIA MS 59.9 53.6 59.6
2 CORALWOOD CENTER NA NA NA
1 CROSS KEYS HS 81.9 78.3 66.6
4 DEKALB ACADEMY OF TECHNOLOGY AND TH 61.8 80.2 71.4
6 DEKALB ALTERNATIVE SCHOOL 42.4 37.8 36.5
4 DEKALB EARLY COLLEGE ACADEMY 106.5 107.1 96.6
7 DEKALB ES OF THE ART 84.1 87.2 77.4
1 DEKALB PATH ACADEMY CHARTER SCHOOL 82.5 81 74
6 DEKALB PREPARATORY ACADEMY CHARTER 61.5 67.3 59.4
7 DEKALB SCHOOL OF THE ARTS 100.4 92.8 90.5
7 DESTINY ACHIEVERS 48.4 54.8 35
1 DRESDEN ES 48.8 57.1 62.9
2 DRUID HILLS HS 80.6 77 72
2 DRUID HILLS MS 73.8 74.6 75.1
4 DUNAIRE ES 48.8 53.5 64.3
1 DUNWOODY ES 91.6 89 92.2
1 DUNWOODY HS 93.4 89.4 81.5
4 EAST DEKALB SPECIAL EDUCATION CENTE NA NA NA
5 EDWARD L. BOUIE, SR. ELEMENTARY SCH 75.5 74.2 75.6
3 ELDRIDGE L. MILLER ELEMENTARY SCHOO 57.6 57.6 50.6
6 ELIZABETH ANDREWS HS 56.5 53.3 37.6
2 EVANSDALE ES 72 65.9 73.2
5 FAIRINGTON ES 45.9 53.6 54.6
2 FERNBANK ES 80.1 77.3 69.5
5 FLAT ROCK ES 55.3 58.2 53
7 FLAT SHOALS ES 47.5 51.1 61.4
4 FREEDOM MS 61.4 65 60.7
2 GLOBE ACADEMY CHARTER SCHOOL I 84.1 90.2 88
4 HAMBRICK ES 57.3 60.5 71.8
2 HAWTHORNE ES 69.2 74.1 76
2 HENDERSON MS 74.8 74.3 71.7
2 HENDERSON MILL ES 78.6 69.7 85.7
1 HIGHTOWER ES 66.9 61 61.7
1 HUNTLEY HILLS ES 72 76 74.9
2 IDLEWOOD ES 61.4 74.6 55.7
4 INDIAN CREEK ES 70.3 70.8 61
2 INTERNATIONAL COMMUNITY SCHOOL 62.9 76.9 67.2
6 INTERNATIONAL STUDENT CENTER 27 34 31.9
1 JOHN ROBERT LEWIS ES NA 67 62
4 JOLLY ES 56.5 62.3 55
7 KELLEY LAKE ES 68.1 70.7 62.7
1 KINGSLEY ES 75.6 81.5 76.1
1 KITTREDGE MAGNET SCHOOL 105.5 106.4 98.1
2 LAKESIDE HS 80.3 82.9 74.9
2 LAUREL RIDGE ES 89 89.9 83.6
3 LEADERSHIP PREPARATORY ACADEMY 69.1 80.2 84.1
3 LITHONIA HS 61.9 71.6 65.8
3 LITHONIA MS 47.1 55.9 61.8
2 LIVSEY ES 75.8 79.3 85.8
3 MARBUT ES 71.8 67.5 70.9
1 MARGARET HARRIS COMPREHENSIVE NA NA NA
5 MARTIN LUTHER KING JR HS 62.9 69.8 58
6 MARY MCLEOD BETHUNE MS 54.9 61.7 53.6
2 MCLENDON ES 73.8 64.7 80.9
7 MCNAIR HS 58.2 64.5 62.2
7 MCNAIR MS 52 58.2 52.8
2 MIDVALE ES 63.3 80.6 75.7
5 MILLER GROVE HS 71.8 74.6 66.2
5 MILLER GROVE MS 55.6 63.1 54.7
1 MONTCLAIR ES 52 52.7 65
1 MONTGOMERY ES 87.3 85.2 81.6
5 MURPHY CANDLER ES 52.1 55.4 51.7
2 MUSEUM SCHOOL AVONDALE ESTATES 88.4 93.2 93.7
2 MUSEUM SCHOOL AVONDALE ESTATES 89.4 89.9 74
7 NARVIE HARRIS ES 72.7 75.9 57.4
2 OAK GROVE ES 89.5 87.7 77.8
1 OAKCLIFF ES 70.2 72.5 76.8
7 OAKVIEW ELEMENTARY 47.7 55.5 64.4
5 PANOLA WAY ES 42.5 59.6 56.2
6 PEACHCREST ES 44.1 49.2 56.9
1 PEACHTREE MS 78.8 77.8 75.1
3 PINE RIDGE ES 57.4 60.4 65
2 PLEASANTDALE ES 61.3 70.9 81.6
3 PRINCETON ES 61.5 56.7 73
5 RAINBOW ES 61.2 72.9 65.9
3 REDAN ES 46.7 56.5 51
3 REDAN HS 72 67 61.7
3 REDAN MS 63.9 63.3 64.1
7 ROBERT SHAW THEME SCHOOL 78.7 86.7 87.9
3 ROCK CHAPEL ES 59.6 63.3 53.6
4 ROCKBRIDGE ES 55.5 69.3 75
7 RONALD E MCNAIR DISCOVER LEARNING A 53.6 58 56.8
6 ROWLAND ES 54.9 54.1 58.2
2 SAGAMORE HILLS ES 77.3 70.3 78.1
5 SALEM MS 55.3 56.7 58.1
1 SEQUOYAH MS 64 64.4 65.5
3 SHADOW ROCK ES 51.7 56.1 62.5
2 SMOKE RISE ES 59.3 69.1 77.1
6 SNAPFINGER ES 50.4 55.3 42.5
5 SOUTHWEST DEKALB HS 76.9 77.3 75.4
3 STEPHENSON HS 78.2 71.6 61.9
3 STEPHENSON MS 63.8 70.2 59.6
4 STONE MILL ES 65.1 69.1 71
4 STONE MOUNTAIN ES 45.2 44.8 64
4 STONE MOUNTAIN HS 69.4 69.1 60.5
4 STONE MOUNTAIN MS 60 61.5 70
3 STONEVIEW ES 45.8 55.6 46.3
1 TAPESTRY PUBLIC CHARTER SCHOOL 57.6 60.6 62.9
4 THE CHAMPION MIDDLE THEME SCHOOL 70.1 82.3 78.1
6 TONEY ES 54.3 51.4 59.8
6 TOWERS HS 57.2 59.6 58.8
2 TUCKER HS 78.4 79.1 65
2 TUCKER MS 71.2 73 69.6
2 UHS OF LAUREL HEIGHTS NA NA NA
1 VANDERLYN ES 93.4 98.5 95
6 WADSWORTH MAGNET SCHOOL FOR HIGH AC 103.8 106.5 88.5
6 WADSWORTH MAGNET SCHOOL FOR HIGH AC 92.7 97 89.9
5 WOODRIDGE ES 65 64.3 65.5
1 WOODWARD ES 60.3 59.2 65.1
3 WYNBROOKE ES 74.4 88.1 89.1

RELATED POSTS

Which DeKalb Schools Are Beating The Odds
December 22, 2017 – Beating the Odds is a statistical analysis that compares a school’s actual performance on the College and Career Ready Performance Index (CCRPI) with the performance of schools with similar characteristics across the state. Schools that perform higher than similar schools are considered “Beating the Odds.”

DeKalb Schools 2017 CCRPI Trends
November 3, 2017 – Scores are up across the state. DeKalb Schools is at the top of the performance increases in the Metro Atlanta area. DCSD’s score is 69.9, up from 66.6 last school year. Georgia’s CCRPI score is 75, a 1.4 point increase since 2016

30 responses to “DeKalb Schools 2018 CCRPI Scores

  1. Interesting. The cluster I am in MES, CMS, CCHS are all on a downward trajectory but it looks like with the changes outlined a Y-O-Y comparison is apples to oranges..

  2. From what I can tell, the calculation change affects high performing schools the most. So … thanks GADOE for consistently changing the calculations and making this whole thing relatively useless.

  3. Any feedback on those schools that had new principals last year due to the mass replacements Dr. Green did at the end of SY 16-17? Panola Way gained 17 points in their former principal’s last year there, but dropped 3 points last year. Flat Rock gained 3 points with their prior principal, but dropped 5 points last year. Interesting since Dr. Green’s big reason to removing those principals was CCRPI scores. Or, as one new principal likes to believe—-the scores dropped because there were people in the school/community working against him.

  4. DSW2Contributor

    FormerDCSD, I’ve been looking back at Stan’s “July 2018 – New and Open Principal Report”:
    http://factchecker.stanjester.com/2018/07/7767/
    and comparing it to the CCRPI data above to see if any of the administrators promoted were from schools that had increasing CCRPIs.
    The only two I see are from Pleasantdale. where the CCRPI went from 61.3 to 70.9 to 81.6. AP Lakwanza Fields has since been promoted to Principal at Evansdale (73.2 CCRPI) and Principal Terri Brown was promoted to Region 3 Coordinator.

  5. Categories of CCRPI:
    1) Content Mastery – legitimate measure of quality of students at a school
    2) Progress – average of math, English, and ELL progress
    3) Closing Gap – points awarded based on meeting grade level expectations
    4) Readiness – literacy and fine arts at grade level, attendance
    5) Graduation rates – measure of success of getting below average students to graduation
    CCPRI – weighted average of these measures

    CCPRI really weights how well each school is educating at-risk students. And that’s important for administrators in judging personnel and resource allocation. My suspicion is that those decisions are much more made comparing the performance of similar schools versus seeing improvement year-to-year. You can compare Montclair, Woodwood, Dresden and Cary Reynolds as the demographics are closer. You can’t compare Ashford Park and Montclair and make any kind of decision on the quality of work of teachers and principals.

    #1 is the only measure that most parents would consider (and that is pretty much comparable between years). We should all want to know what kind of progress (#2) our child is going to make, but mixing in ELL progress muddies the stat. In addition, they don’t break out how the school does at teaching students that are above grade level. That’s more what I care about.

    I thought the CCPRI scores from last year made all the high performing schools look really good and more reflected ‘quality’ as parents see it. The adjustments seem to intend to show more ‘quality’ from the perspective of how good a job the staff are doing considering the hand they’ve been dealt.

  6. Is there some ratio that can show CCPRI score per Econimcally disadvantaged and CCPRI score per ELL? I couldn’t get the table on the GADOE site to rank the scores with such criteria. For instance, Pleasantdale has a score of 81.6% but ~92% of the students are economically disadvantaged and 53% are ELLs, whereas Brairlake has a score of 83.4% but only 32% EcD and 11% ELL. Pleasantdale has no foundation and little fundraising, whereas Evansdale (61% EcD and 31% ELL) has a foundation that raises something like $50K (and can hire staff with that) and a CCPRI of 73.2. As a parent, I want to use these numbers to help the school fundraise and by getting neighbors and parents to volunteer.

    I guess maybe the ‘closing the gap’ number somewhat represents what I am looking for, but I
    d like to rank the table with those demographic numbers.

  7. Dunwoody High School … is literally going to shit.

  8. PDparent, the following link has data for 2016-2017. Accountability->Performance Targets shows performance of each school compared to state and district averages by race and economic status. At the same website, under Indicators->Demographics, they provide total numbers in each of the categories. It shows for 2016-2017 that Pleaseantdale was 94% economically disadvantaged (819/871).
    https://gaawards.gosa.ga.gov/analytics/K12ReportCard

    Last year they provided Content Mastery by subject by the same categories (race/economic status), but it came out in January.
    http://www.gadoe.org/CCRPI/Pages/default.aspx

    This link has a bunch of data.
    https://gosa.georgia.gov/downloadable-data

  9. PDParent, last year’s data has not been posted, but 2016-2017 is there. Pleasantdale was 94% economically disadvantaged in 2016.

    Accountability->Performance Targets
    Indicators & Demographics
    https://gaawards.gosa.ga.gov/analytics/K12ReportCard

    More data here on CCRPI:
    http://www.gadoe.org/CCRPI/Pages/default.aspx

  10. Dekalb County Schools Stink

    So, Chamblee High and Middle are now a “C” schools and that is WITH the magnet program. Dunwoody High is a B- with Peachtree is a C. Finally, both Cross Keys and Sequoyah are failing schools.

    Hell of a portfolio you have there, Stan.

  11. The state’s list of failing schools will be long this year. See if you can guess which school district will have the most failing schools on that list.

  12. My goodness, where would Chamblee be if it didn’t have the magnet program?

  13. What is going on at Narvie J. Harris that there was almost a 20 point drop in score, didn’t their principal just get promoted to a Regional Superintendent?

    I also noticed that Snapfinger ES and Stoneview ES are the only two traditional schools to score below 50 percent.

  14. escapee from dekalb

    Bless your heart cap22– what made you think actual achievement was the reason for the promotion to Regional Superintendent.

  15. dekalbTaxpayer

    Folks, why is there any surprise? The AJC did a story on SAT scores and DeKalb was one point – ONE point – better than the City of Atlanta. Now think about what that means. We’re not talking Fulton County schools, we’re talking inner city. With Chamblee and Dunwoody and Lakeside weighing in for Dekalb, one point separates them from Atlanta City. Just wait until Green has dragged down these three high schools. We’ll be looking up at the City of Atlanta. What a joke.

    By the way – does Green have any measurable goals yet??

    Forsyth 1167
    Fayette, 1142
    Cherokee 1122
    Cobb, 1107
    Gwinnett, 1102
    Fulton, 1091
    DeKalb, 998
    Atlanta Public Schools, 997

  16. DeKalb Schools has 21 high schools and the most failing schools in Georgia. It’s challenging for a handful of schools to bring up the average for 100,00+ students at 130+ schools.

    Green needs to address academic achievement (among other things) systemically. The board spent all weekend this past weekend on measurable goal indicators. The goals are defined by the strategic plan the school district is getting input on for when the new plan starts in 2019.

    Current Strategic Plan
    * Student Success with Equity and Access
    * Stakeholder Engagement
    * Staff Efficacy and Excellence
    * Internal and External Communication
    * Organizational Effectiveness and Efficiency

    Academic goal indicators include MAP, Milestones, Graduation Rate and CCRPI

    Equity and Access goals include wrap around services indicators

    Organization effectiveness and efficiency indicators include the completion of work orders, etc …

  17. Dekalb County Schools Stink

    At what point do parents just throw their hands up and give up on this crappy school system?

  18. But, but, but…
    We had a Convocation! We have billboards and tee-shirts that say we love ourselves! Our ACT scores are just one point short of the national average! Yay, we’re average! And we’re so proud that now only one in four students doesn’t graduate on time.
    This is all good, right? Right?

  19. Expand Magnet Model

    And the frustrating part is that there are a handful of schools performing st the highest levels, such as Kittrrsge Magnet School and DeKalb County cannot or will not expand that program to other schools.

  20. Will DCSD do a report to analyze how they did on their 2014-2019 goals? Most of their goals don’t have specific measurements or specific gains they hoped to achieve.

    And…lucky for DCSD, most of the academic measures keep changing or the criteria for them change yearly so they can’t be tracked year to year.

    And, the ajc pointed out how poorly DCSD does on organizational effectiveness and efficiency related to work orders. It would be fun to see an audit on the district’s response time to emails/calls/tech support tickets, requests for information

  21. Balanced ScoreCard – In theory, the Balanced Scorecard (http://www.dekalbschoolsga.org/superintendent/strategic-plan/#tab-3705ccc11a9a6469c8c) – Is supposed to provide an assessment of how well the district is implementing the strategic plan.

    Work Orders – I have a hard copy of an analysis done on the work orders … I wouldn’t call it an audit though. I’ll post once I get a digital copy.

  22. Escapee from DeKalb, you are so right.

  23. DSW2Contributor

    Meanwhile, Dr. Beasley and his team of other former-DCSD administrators are doing great work in Clayton County:
    ————————————————————————————————————————————————-
    “We are excited about the fact that we do not have a school on the Turnaround Eligible Schools list,” Clayton schools chief Morcease Beasley said. “We are proud to stand alongside Gwinnett and Cobb among the six largest school districts in the state with this distinction.”

    The other big districts — DeKalb and Fulton counties and Atlanta — still have listed schools, although Atlanta has three fewer than last year, with 13, and DeKalb has two fewer, at 14. Fulton added a school, and now has nine on the list.
    Source:
    https://www.ajc.com/news/state–regional-education/georgia-identifies-schools-that-need-additional-support/Vjxi2ggneI0FVtLuMAUxXN/

  24. DSW2Contributor

    Below is a repost of this comment I made back on October 7, 2017:
    http://factchecker.stanjester.com/2017/10/7470/#comment-5400
    ———————————————————————————
    Sorry to change the subject, but I have to ask if the board realizes that Dr. Beasley is skimming the cream of our crop?
    Since he was named Clayton County Schools Superintendent on May 8 (http://www.news-daily.com/news/morcease-beasley-named-clayton-county-schools-superintendent/article_bcf681d2-2be2-515d-87e0-ef99956264e5.html) Dr. Beasley has hired five excellent leaders away from Dekalb. That’s one per month!
    Jamie Wilson is the latest, having been appointed Clayton’s Chief Human Resources Officer on October 2:
    http://www.clayton.k12.ga.us/news/district_news/board_appointments_-_october_2__2017/
    The Clayton board also hired Twana Culberson Bowman on September 5:
    http://www.clayton.k12.ga.us/cms/One.aspx?portalId=54515&pageId=9842340
    and Denise Hall on August 28:
    http://www.clayton.k12.ga.us/cms/One.aspx?portalId=54515&pageId=9775076
    and Sandra Nunez on July 31:
    http://www.clayton.k12.ga.us/cms/One.aspx?portalId=54515&pageId=9443304
    and Ralph Simpson on July 20:
    http://www.clayton.k12.ga.us/cms/One.aspx?portalId=54515&pageId=9384014
    There is also speculation that the Druid Hills Principal is leaving to go to Clayton. I don’t know if that is correct, but she is definitely out since the her current position is already posted on PATS (along with the Livsey Elementary Principal position, the job that Jamie Wilson is leaving.)

  25. @DSW2

    If I may also add a comment that does not go here:
    Calloway, Chezia resigned on October 12, 2018. She was the Executive Director of Special Ed. I am not sure if she was here three full years. The reason that she gave was moving. Several people in the top levels of administration have left. When a school has a large turn over the principal is expected to put steps in place to retain their ‘good’staff. It does not seem like this is expected of any one above the level of principal.

  26. Joy,

    You might be thinking of other school districts or Dekalb years ago.

    Some Dekalb schools lost 10 to 20% of their teaching staff last year.

  27. DSW2 Contributor,

    I disagree that Beasley is hiring the “cream of our crop.” Some of the names you listed are long-term problems that I am glad to be rid of, including Beasley. I want to encourage him to continue to hire as many DCSD administrators as possible. Only when all of the “friends-and-family” are gone will the district begin to improve.

    As for Calloway, she was a huge disappointment and stayed too long. Green needs to find a real special education leader, not another friend.

  28. Kirk, respect you so much. I know that you are a tireless advocate for special education. That is so important and an area that many people forget. I didn’t know Ms. Callaway so I cannot speak one way or the other on her
    But I have family and friends that lives in Clayton County and family members that work in the CCSS. They all agree that Dr. Beasley is doing an excellent job. Clayton County is the poorest county in metro Atlanta. Dr. Beasley inherited a school system that was in financial and academic difficulty, and he is making a positive difference out there. He is approachable and open. I respect the fact that both he and Dr. Simpson had the strength to not just stay in DeKalb but to move someplace else and make a difference. DeKalb cannot blame its current problems on them. Dr Beasley has been gone about three years. Dr. Simpson almost a year.
    When my former principal retired, our current principal liked to blame any problems on her. Even though he was the real issue, nothing was his fault. Well, we all knew that it would be just be a matter of time before that strategy didn’t work anymore. So now he blames everything on the staff. Perhaps he will see this and recognize himself. Hopefully, he and DeKalb will stop looking to blame others and work on solutions for our problems.

  29. Joy,
    I am glad to hear Dr. Beasley is doing well in his new position. The opinions of employees are good benchmarks.
    The current problems in DeKalb are continuations of the same problems we have had for decades.
    Dr. Beasley was over curriculum and instruction when test score dropped in DeKalb County. He was unable to produce a document without numerous spelling and grammatical errors. He liked to speak in edu-jargon, but was absolutely ineffective. Remember the “missing” textbook money? That was him.
    Ralph Simpson was caught requiring principals to buy a book he wrote and demoted from regional superintendent to assistant principal. After doing nothing, literally, he was promoted to be the principal of Towers H.S. A year and a half later, after showing no demonstrable improvement at Towers, he was back to being regional superintendent. Why didn’t he go to jail? Simpson is also the person who convinced the superintendent to spend $500,000 for a program which is free from the U.S. Dept. of Education.
    If those are not problems you are glad to be rid of, what would be?

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