DeKalb Schools Extends School 1 Hour For Solar Eclipse

The DeKalb County School District (DCSD) will extend its school day by one hour on Monday, Aug. 21, 2017, to provide safe viewing and instructional opportunities related to the expected solar eclipse that day.

Dismissal will occur one hour later than usual, at the end of the extended learning period. Our three-tier dismissal system starts with elementary schools, followed by high schools, and finally middle schools. Parents are encouraged to contact their child’s school to determine the exact dismissal time on Monday, Aug. 21.

According to NASA, the solar eclipse will occur across North America that day when the moon obscures 97.4 percent of the sun. The solar eclipse will be viewable around 1:02 p.m. and end at 4 p.m. DCSD reminds its community that it is not safe to stare directly into the sun without special glasses, and it is providing lessons that will allow students to safely take advantage of the moment.

Those lessons may include the distribution of special viewing glasses, and opportunities to view the eclipse using monitors and safe viewing options. Many teachers will also include information on the eclipse in their lessons that day, as appropriate.

Note: It’s a bad idea to look directly at the sun during an eclipse.


Other schools delaying dismissal:

COBB COUNTY – 45-minute delay

FORSYTH COUNTY – 40-minute delay (ES I: 3:00 p.m., ES II: 3:40 p.m., High: 4:20 p.m., Middle: 4:55 p.m.)

GWINNETT COUNTY – One-hour delay

HENRY COUNTY – One-hour delay (Elementary: 3:25 p.m., High: 4:15 p.m., Middle: 4:55 p.m.)

MARIETTA CITY SCHOOLS – 15-minute delay

PAULDING COUNTY – One-hour delay (Elementary: 3:30 p.m., High: 4:25 p.m., Middle: 4:35 p.m.)

ROCKDALE COUNTY – Elementary: 3:00 p.m., High: 3:45 p.m., Middle: 4:30 p.m.


Cobb County School District – Eclipse 2017 Parent Information

The 2017 Eclipse Across America will happen on Monday, August 21st and Cobb Schools are ready! Cobb teachers and students will have the opportunity to experience an extremely rare and awe inspiring event – a total solar eclipse. Cobb will be using this “teachable moment” to increase the science literacy of our students. We will be utilizing a variety of resources curated by NASA, the Tellus Science Museum and Cobb educators to provide an unforgettable learning experience for our students K-12.

Information For Parents

Cobb is in the path of the eclipse. We will experience a 98% total solar eclipse. The eclipse will begin after lunch and last about 2 hours. The skies will gradually begin to darken as the moon moves into the path of the sun. Over time the sky it will become increasingly dark. Here in Cobb, the near total eclipse will happen between 2:35 and 2:40. It will last just over 2 minutes. Then the skies will gradually become filled with more light, as the moon moves out of the path of the sun.

Each Cobb school will provide students opportunities to participate in the eclipse phenomena. Participation will vary from going outdoors to view the eclipse with official eclipse glasses or student engineered solar eclipse viewers (pinhole cameras) to watching the live NASA eclipse broadcast. Teachers across the district have been working hard to align the learning experiences on the 21st to concepts taught in each grade or course. For example, students in grade four will be learning about the motion of the moon and Earth and how it relates to the Sun. While students in Kindergarten will be communicating observations about the sun and moon in the sky. And students in grade eight will be exploring light waves and lenses.

Schools interested in having students go outdoors to view the eclipse will be sending home forms requesting parent permission. To learn more about the 2017 Eclipse Across America please visit http://eclipse2017.nasa.gov.

17 responses to “DeKalb Schools Extends School 1 Hour For Solar Eclipse

  1. Stan, “bad idea” is an understatement. It’s not too late to purchase solar eclipse viewing glasses. Also, some libraries will have them for distribution.

  2. It’s too bad the tiered bussing makes it where everyone has to have a delay, instead of elementary, the ones whose dismissal time is most affected. Thankful, though, that kids won’t be on busses or walking from bus stop at the peak eclipse time of 2:30, when drivers around them will likely be looking up at the sun, rather than down at the road.

  3. I think the safety aspect is driving this decision for a number of school districts.

  4. As it should! I think some people may not realize this aspect – I’ve heard some say they’re mad that the school system is taking away their right to experience this event as a family. I suppose they could check their child out early, if they want to experience it together. If I had kids in the system, and if there was a big difference in eclipse percentage between here and somewhere relatively nearby, I’d consider keep my kids home that day and taking them for the better “view” experience, as it’s likely a nearly once-in-a-lifetime event. As it is, 97%’s good enough for me 🙂

  5. Doraville guy

    Are they going to pay teachers for that extra hour ?

  6. Just wondering

    Why not delay the start one hour, so that the day is still 8 hours?

  7. That might cause more confusion and planned instruction will be delayed by the eclipse already… just speculation.

  8. Stan, can you confirm if the county has a plan to purchase and distribute eclipse viewing glasses to students?

  9. It would be a terrible shame if the students can not watch the eclipse but I am betting that is what is going to happen. The students will be inside doing instructional things instead of watching the eclipse.

  10. There are obviously no district wide policies that contemplate solar eclipses. I’m not aware of the central office purchasing eclipse viewing glasses for all 100,000 students and 15,000 employees. I believe the central office is giving the schools some flexibility on this and hasn’t sent out a district wide mandate instructing the schools what to do during the eclipse. So, what will the students do? When school starts or at your Open House, ask your school council, teacher and principal what the plan is.

  11. Where are you? All the board members but you are on stage. Even if you don’t support the convocation, you should be here to support the teachers and staff of your area. Even if people don’t support the war, they should support the soldiers. We are the people on the frontline. #SoreLoser

  12. I don’t believe I’m the only one that couldn’t make it. I don’t see how me attending the convocation makes anybody feel loved or supported. I love the school house employees and nothing says love like “Pay To The Order Of”. That’s the trench you’ll find me in.

  13. Stan,

    It is not the special events that speak to the dedication or work of anyone. Just like in a marriage it is the day to day things that truly mean the most. Many people like to be seen at events. You and Nancy demonstrate your love and support every day. I appreciate that very much. You have the courage to take a stand on issues that are unpopular. I did not need to see you at an event to know that you care and the support the schools.

    Thank you

  14. Stan,
    Do you know if DCSD has considered ‘excused’ absence for students who will be going out of town to maximize eclipse viewing next Monday? I have seen the plans for late dismissal, etc. but also know throngs if people will be migrating North for better viewing. It would appear waiting until 11:30am to check a student out will equal sitting in your car stuck in traffic. I was just curious to see if this had been discussed with the powers that be and see if they might consider an excused absence for the day?
    Thanks!

  15. @ Stan: I have emailed the principal at my son’s school with no response. I am guessing that a no return email in 5 days means that they are not doing anything for the eclipse. Also, the weekly updates have only had this blurp in it on 8/13.

    “The DeKalb County School District (DCSD) will extend its school day by one hour on Monday, Aug. 21, 2017, to provide safe viewing and instructional opportunities related to the expected solar eclipse that day.

    Dismissal will occur one hour later than usual, at the end of the extended learning period. Our three-tier dismissal system starts with elementary schools, followed by high schools, and finally middle schools. Parents are encouraged to contact their child’s school to determine the exact dismissal time on Monday, Aug. 21.

    According to NASA, the solar eclipse will occur across North America that day when the moon obscures 97.4 percent of the sun. The solar eclipse will be viewable around 1:02 p.m. and end at 4 p.m. DCSD reminds its community that it is not safe to stare directly into the sun without special glasses, and it is providing lessons that will allow students to safely take advantage of the moment.

    Those lessons may include the distribution of special viewing glasses, and opportunities to view the eclipse using monitors and safe viewing options.”

    So I am guessing that our students will not have the opportunity to watch the solar eclipse this year.

  16. Quite a few people have expressed the desire to do something with their family for this event. DeKalb Schools administration communicated this to me yesterday regarding eclipse absences.

    DCSD is excited to experience the Aug. 21 solar eclipse with its students. As part of its one-hour extended learning day, plans are in place for students to view the solar eclipse and protective glasses have been purchased so students can do so safely. Also, the Fernbank Science Center will host a series of educational activities and safe viewing opportunities.

    Classes will be held on Aug. 21. If parents choose to keep students home on that day, the absence will be counted as unexcused. However, students will be allowed to make up any work that was missed that day.

    Department of Communications

  17. Thank you, Stan. I just wished this communication had come out earlier.

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